6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

This route is well-paved and an easy walk manageable for children. Hear the rushing waters of the stream in Jesmond Dene, see a Shoe tree, and catch a glimpse into Newcastle’s history.

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Route overview of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

Route overview

Our route starts at Leazes Park.

Leazes Park is Newcastle City Centre’s oldest park. It was officially opened in 1873 and has since been restored to its former Victorian glory. It celebrates its 150th birthday in December 2023! When the park was drained as part of improvement efforts, several unusual items were found, including toys, a hand grenade, expensive ladies’ shoes, caltrops, and spiked metal devices meant to impede moving enemy vehicles.

Leazes Park Bandstand

Leazes Park Bandstand. Credit: Newcastle Gateshead Initiative

Exit the park past the parking lot and playground and left onto Richardson Road. Cross the road onto the pathway, passing the Dental Hospital and its parking lot on your right. When you reach the gated green area, walk to the right of it and turn right onto Lover’s Lane.

Part 1 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk from Leazes Park onto Richardson Road

Part 1 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

Turn left into the first street and continue straight over the circle and bridge into Town Moor. Follow the path curving to the right, then turn left at the end of the road.

Part 2 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk from Lover's Lane to the Town Moor

Part 2 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

Bigger than Hyde Park and Hampstead Heath combined and larger than New York’s Central Park, Town Moor has 400 hectares of open space. Nearby, you will find the “Seeing Stone”. Not much is known about it, but it makes for a great photo opportunity! Additionally, you’ll find a Victorian Bandstand similar to the one in Leazes Park. Just next to the lake, you’ll find the Freemen’s Clock, which was erected to commemorate Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation in 1953. As the Freemen have cattle grazing rights for the Town Moor, you’ll see the cattle there from April to October. This right ensures that the Town Moor isn’t built upon or developed, thus protecting its history.

Exit the park past the lake on your left to continue up on the path next to Great North Road (on your right).

Part 3 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk through Town Moor and Exhibition Park

Part 3 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

At the roundabout, take the exit onto Jesmond Dene Road.

Part 4 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk along Great North Road onto Jesmond Dene Road

Part 4 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

Continue following this road into the Park and along the Red Walk.

Part 5 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk into Jesmond Dene along the Red Walk

Part 5 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

Jesmond Dene is a wooded valley along the Ouseburn River. You’ll find several native and exotic trees and wildlife, including the Kingfisher and Red Squirrel. This area is stunningly picturesque, so feel free to detour around here to the Old Mill, the Falls, and pockets along the river. Get your camera ready!

Bridge in Jesmond Dene

Bridge in Jesmond Dene. Credit: Dun Deagh

Ouseburn is the hub for budding artists and creatives. There’s lots to do and see here, including the Ouseburn Farm, Seven Stories Bookshop, restaurants, and the Biscuit Factory. To find out more about the events and activities held, click here.

Old Mill, Ouseburn

Old Mill, Ouseburn. Credit: Dun Deagh

Continue along the Red Walk and under two bridges. Red Walk becomes Ouseburn Road after the second bridge. Turn left where the path splits to the left to walk past the Shoe Tree. The Shoe Tree is the last sight on this route, so you can exit the route at any pathway or road.

Part 6 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk to the Shoe TreePart 6 of the 6km Serene Newcastle Green Walk

The Shoe Tree is an old Sycamore, and the first few pairs of shoes were sighted in the ’90s. It is believed that students threw them up onto the tree when their final exams were complete. However, it seems others have joined in on the fun just for the thrill of it. You can see how the style of shoes has changed over the last few decades!

Shoe Tree in Armstrong Park

Shoe Tree. Credit: Harvesting Hecate

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If you enjoyed this route, see our Ouseburn Circular Walk.

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